Radnor Township Civic Association (Highland Avenue Community Center), is the community center historically used by Second Baptist Church and St. Johns A.M.E. Church for wedding and birthday celebrations , revival meetings, and funeral gatherings.A multi-church collaboration in Wayne is working to restore and upgrade the 100-year-old structure with the goal of providing expanded community programs and services to the West Wayne community.

 

[update Aug 2019]

Radnor Township Civic Association (RTCA) Re-opens

[Scott Laird- Chair, Local Mission]

RTCA was formed in early 1938 and took title to the 1916 building at 248 Highland Ave., Wayne, PA which remains today as the place of community activities for African-Americans of the Main Line. Five years ago, the building became unusable due to extensive water damage and mold growth. Building restoration required compliance with current township codes at significant cost. WPC joined a collaboration of Radnor churches and more than 30 local contractors to raise funds, donate materials, and provide volunteer labor to restore use of the RTCA structure as a community center- the only remaining such African-American-owned facility on the Main Line. Our Vacation Bible School raised enough money to fund the new wheelchair access restroom. In May, Radnor Township granted the required Certificate of Occupancy for the restored main and basement levels. (The second floor reahbilitation and central air conditioning are future endeavors by the RTCA Board of Directors.)

Major Milestone: On Saturday, June 1, 2019, the RTCA Board celebrated the grand re-opening of the center with a program of prayer, praise, and thanks to honor God and recognize, first and foremost, those  churches (including WPC) and contractors who participated to make the restoration successful.

How  RTCA Serves the Community:  Before the building closure, the building was used for revivals and funerals and special services by 1st Baptist and St. John AME churches as well as .  for community meetings, wedding receptions, birthday parties, and music events because African-Americans were not accepted at most event spaces on the Main Line. Re-opening the building enables those same functions to occur plus new programs—several of which are being supported by the recent grants from WPC to RTCA, Main Line Mentoring, and The Wayne Senior Center through the Shalitta Bequest. WPC further assisted RTCA in reaching out to Surrey Services in Devon for future transportation services for mentoring activities.